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How to E-file Your Tax Return By October 15

efile now, it is the right time.

The 2017 Tax Return e-file deadline is October 15, 2018. This deadline applies to you if you filed or e-filed a tax extension by April 18, 2018, or if you did not file a return or extension by April 18. If you do not file your tax return by October 15 and you owe taxes, late filing penalties will apply. Payment penalties and interest will also apply if you did not pay your taxes owed by April 18. The penalties for not filing a return are higher than the penalties for not paying taxes owed. Find out if late penalties apply to you.

If you are expecting a refund, you will not face any penalties. However, you must file your return within three years after the original return deadline to claim your refund. After three years, the refund is gone. 

Step 1: Prepare and File Your Tax Return

If you do not have an efile.com account, click the button below to start and efile your tax return. If you are already an efile.com user, click the "Registered Users Sign In Here" link to start/continue and efile your return. 

Start Your 2017 Tax Return Now!    Registered Users Sign In Here

If you still do not have all the documents you need to prepare a return, you should contact any employers and other organizations that owe you information.

Please contact efile.com tax support if you need help with your return.

Step 2: Pay Your Taxes or Set Up Tax Payments

Use one of the following options below to pay your taxes owed: 

If You Have the Funds to Pay Your Taxes

Read more about the direct tax payment options above.

If You DO NOT Have the Funds to Pay Your Taxes

  • Short-Term Extension of Time to Pay: If you will be able to pay your balance due within 120 days, you can apply for an extension of time to pay with the IRS. There is no fee to apply for a payment extension.
  • Installment Payment Plan Agreement: If you owe no more than $50,000, you may qualify for an installment payment plan agreement with the IRS. There is a non-refundable $105 fee to apply, and you might still owe interest and/or penalties to the IRS for late payment.
  • Offer-in-Compromise: An offer-in-compromise is your last resort and is not an option for most taxpayers. It allows you to pay off your tax debt for lower than the amount you owe. The IRS will only ever approve this if they believe that they will never be able to obtain the full amount from you, because of your financial circumstances. 

Learn more about the above tax payment plan options.

What to Do If Your Extension Was Rejected

Since the IRS no longer accepts extensions after April 18 (even if they were filed and rejected on or by April 18), you should efile or file your tax return as soon as possible (and pay as much as you can) to avoid additional filing penalties.