Dependent Pages

Qualifying Relative Dependent

“Children-Taxes"

Qualifying children or qualifying relatives are Dependents and reduce taxes. This tool helps you find out if you can claim an individual as a qualifying relative. If you need to find out who a qualifying child is use the eFile DEPENDucator tool. An overlook of all child related tax credits and deductions.

Once you are clear on Dependents, Filing Status etc. estimate your 2022 Tax Refund Calculator. Find out what your Tax Refund might be, or if you owe Taxes.

Who Is A Qualifying Relative?

A qualifying relative is a person who meets the IRS requirements to be your dependent for tax purposes. If someone is your qualifying relative, then you can claim them as a dependent on your tax return. They may also qualify for the Child Tax Credit, Credit for Other Dependents, or the Child and Dependent Care Credit.

Note: Even though it's called qualifying relative, the individual does not necessarily have to be related to you.

  • A Qualifying Relative must be either related to you in one of the ways listed in the tool below, OR must live with you all year as a member of your household
  • Qualifying Relatives can be Dependents of any age, including those who are age 18 or older
  • A Qualifing Relative must have a valid Social Security numbers or TIN (tax payer identification number)
  • You must generally provide more than half of Qualifying Relative's total support during the calendar year

Despite the name, an IRS Qualifying Relative does not necessarily have to be related to you. This means you may be able to claim a boyfriend or girlfriend etc. or life partner. Use the RELucator tax tool below to find out if you have a qualifying relative and see if they qualify for other tax credits!

Qualifying Relative or RELucator Tool Learn More About Qualifying Relatives

RELucator

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Who Qualifies as a Dependent?
Is this individual a U.S. citizen, a U.S. resident alien, a U.S. national, or a resident of Canada or Mexico?
Details
Does this individual qualify as your - or anybody else's - qualifying child (Dependent) e.g. son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, or stepsister, or a descendant (e.g. grandchild, niece, nephew etc. of any of them ?
Not Sure?
Is this individual related to you OR has lived with you - but not a qualifying child of yours? Furthermore, the qualifying relative doesn't have to live with all year (unlike a non-relative) as a member of your household, the relative could be related to you in one of the following ways: your child, stepchild, or foster child, or a descendant of any of them (e.g. your grandchild) or a legally adopted child, or your r brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, or stepsister, or your father, mother, grandparent, or other direct ancestor, but not foster parent, or your stepfather or stepmother, or a niece or nephew e.g. son or daughter of your brother or sister, or a son or daughter of your half brother or half sister, or an uncle e.g. brother or sister of your father or mother. Your son-in-law, daughter-in-law, father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law, or sister-in-law.
OR
Did this individual live with you all year as a member of your household eg. boyfriend, girlfriend, father/mother of your child etc. (Note: your relationship must not violate local law versus common law.).
Relative vs. Non-Relative?
Was the 2022 income for this individual below $4,400?
Details, Exceptions
Did you provide support for this individual for more than 6 months during 2022?
Details about supporting an Individual
Did this individual file a joint return for 2022 (unless that joint return is filed only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid)? Exceptions, Details
Are you filing a married filing joint return and you or your spouse is claimed as a dependent by an other taxpayer?
Details, Exceptions
Does this individual also qualify to be a qualifying relative or dependent of another person? More Details
The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the year. If a child is treated as the qualifying child of the noncustodial parent under the rules for children of divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart), described earlier, a noncustodial parent can claim the child if the following applies click here.
If somebody claimed a chiled incorrectly e.g in the case of divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart) learn about the IRS Tie Braker rules. If somebody incorrectly claimed your dependent on a tax return for the given tax year, you can prepare your return(s) on eFile.com before you download, print and mail them in as you can NOT e-file and claim the dependent. What to do if your dependent has been claimed? Once you submitted your return you will need to contact the IRS about the tie braker rules.
Yes, you can claim this individual as your Qualifying Relative or Dependent.
No, you can not claim this individual as your Qualifying Relative or Dependent.
Will this person qualify as your Dependent?
Will this person qualify for the Child Tax Credit?
Can you claim the Child and Dependent Care Credit?
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After using the tool to determine the status of one or more relatives or dependents, start your return on eFile.com: IT's Less Taxing! IT = Income Taxes and we make IT easy for you. Review our tax service levels and keep more of your hard-earned money during the year and when you e-file your taxes.

See more details on claiming a qualifying relative on your return. Generally, if someone lives with you and you take care of them, they may qualify as your dependent for tax purposes. This includes family relatives, but also can include a boyfriend or girlfriend. It does not, however, include a wife or husband for which you provide support for. There are no circumstances when you can claim your spouse as a dependent on your taxes, even if you provide their support (stay-at-home parent, disabled spouse, unemployed, etc.). When you file as married filing jointly, you are given several tax breaks.

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